Azure Virtual Machine Domain Name


VMs are not joined to the domain Follow these instructions if you're having issues joining VMs to the domain. Join the VM manually using the process in Join a Windows Server virtual machine to a managed domain or using the domain join template. Try pinging the domain name from command line on VM. Incorrect credentials Cause:

Purchasing Azure virtual machine domain name

Azure Resource Manager: azurerm_public_ip - Terraform by HashiCorp

VMs are not joined to the domain Follow these instructions if you're having issues joining VMs to the domain. Join the VM manually using the process in Join a Windows Server virtual machine to a managed domain or using the domain join template. Try pinging the domain name from command line on VM. Incorrect credentials Cause: There was a typo made when the credentials were entered in the Azure Resource Manager template interface fixes.

Take one of the following actions to resolve. Manually add the VMs to a domain. Timeout waiting for user input Cause: The account used to complete the domain join may have multi-factor authentication MFA. Temporarily remove MFA for the account. Use a service account. The account used during provisioning doesn't have permissions to complete the operation Cause: The account being used doesn't have permissions to join VMs to the domain due to compliance and regulations.

Use an account that is a member of the Administrator group. Grant the necessary permissions to the account being used. Domain name doesn't resolve Cause 1: VMs are on a virtual network that's not associated with the virtual network VNET where the domain is located. Fix 1: See Create a virtual network peering - Resource Manager, different subscriptions.

Cause 2: Fix 2: Cause 3: Fix 3: Take one of the following actions to resolve, following the steps in [Change DNS servers]. Follow these instructions to confirm the components are installed and to check for error messages. Open File Explorer and navigate to C: If the file is missing, it indicates that the PowerShell DSC that installed the two components was not able to run in the security context provided.

If the file C: Credentials provided during input for the Azure Resource Manager template were incorrect or permissions were insufficient.

PowerShell DSC was able to start and execute but failed to complete as it can't sign in to Windows Virtual Desktop and obtain needed information.

Confirm the items in the following list. Make sure the account doesn't have MFA. Confirm that the tenant name is accurate and the tenant exists in Windows Virtual Desktop. Confirm the account has at least RDS Contributor permissions.

Authentication failed, error in C: Confirm account used for connecting to Windows Virtual Desktop has permissions on the tenant to create host pools. Confirm account doesn't have MFA. The following section covers troubleshooting issues applicable to the Windows Virtual Desktop Agent and the token. The agent isn't able to update itself to a new version. Follow these instructions to manually update the agent. Download a new version of the agent on the session host VM.

Run the installer for the new version of the Windows Virtual Desktop Agent. Complete the installation Wizard. Registration token has expired or has been generated with expiration value of Follow these instructions to fix the agent registry error.

Generate new token with Rds-NewRegistrationInfo. Confirm that the -ExpriationHours parameter is set to 72 max value is RDAgentBootLoader service has been stopped. Port may be closed. Follow these instructions to open port Confirm port is open by downloading the PSPing tool from Sysinternal tools.

Open the command prompt as an administrator and issue the command below: PsPing v2. Connecting to For Microsoft Windows 10, the Windows Virtual Desktop side-by-side stack is enabled with enablesxstackrs.

There are three main ways the side-by-side stack gets installed or enabled on session host pool VMs: The output of qwinsta will list rdp-sxs in the output if the side-by-side stack is installed and enabled. Examine the registry entries listed below and confirm that their values match. If registry keys are missing or values are mismatched, follow the instructions in Create a host pool with PowerShell on how to reinstall the side-by-side stack. The side-by-side stack isn't installed on the session host VM.

Follow these instructions to install the side-by-side stack on the session host VM. Download and import The Windows Virtual Desktop PowerShell module to use in your PowerShell session if you haven't already, then run this cmdlet to sign in to your account: Add-RdsAccount -DeploymentUrl "https: How to fix a Windows Virtual Desktop side-by-side stack that malfunctions There are known circumstances that can cause the side-by-side stack to malfunction: The VM used to run remediation must be on the same subnet and domain as the VM with the malfunctioning side-by-side stack.

Follow these instructions to run remediation from the same subnet and domain: Download PsExec from https: Start command prompt as local administrator. Navigate to folder where PsExec was unzipped. From command prompt, use the following command: Note This dialog will show up only the first time PsExec is run. After the command prompt session opens on the VM with the malfunctioning side-by-side stack, run qwinsta and confirm that an entry named rdp-sxs is available. If not, a side-by-side stack isn't present on the VM so the issue isn't tied to the side-by-side stack.

Run the following command, which will list Microsoft components installed on the VM with the malfunctioning side-by-side stack. If your operating system is Windows Server, restart the VM that had the malfunctioning side-by-side stack either with Azure portal or from the PsExec tool. If your operating system is Microsoft Windows 10, continue with the instructions below: The recommended process: Alternatively, you can run the following cmdlets: Follow the steps in the next sections to check the group policy setting, identify the version of Windows 10 Enterprise multi-session, and install the corresponding update.

If the group policy setting is Enabled, change it to Disabled. If it's already disabled, then leave it as-is. Note If you set group policy through your domain, disable this setting on policies that target these Windows 10 Enterprise multi-session VMs.

Identify which version of Windows 10 Enterprise multi-session you're using To check which version of Windows 10 Enterprise multi-session you have: Sign in with your admin account.

Enter "About" into the search bar next to the Start menu. Select About your PC. Check the number next to "Version. Now that you know your version number, skip ahead to the relevant section. Version If your version number says "," install the KB update. Next steps For an overview on troubleshooting Windows Virtual Desktop and the escalation tracks, see Troubleshooting overview, feedback, and support. To troubleshoot issues while creating a tenant and host pool in a Windows Virtual Desktop environment, see Tenant and host pool creation.

To troubleshoot issues while configuring a virtual machine VM in Windows Virtual Desktop, see Session host virtual machine configuration.

To troubleshoot issues with Windows Virtual Desktop client connections, see Remote Desktop client connections.

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Azure Tutorial : Set DNS name to a Azure Virtual Machine created via Resource Manager - in 2 minutes

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